The Six Counties in Six Days (Northern Road Trip Itinerary)

Day 5: Armagh and Down

Experience the beautiful town of Armagh

Armagh is the county town of County Armagh. It is the ecclesiastical capital of Ireland – the seat of the Archbishops of Armagh, the Primates of All Ireland for both the Roman Catholic Church and the Church of Ireland. In ancient times, nearby Navan Fort was a pagan ceremonial site and one of the great royal capitals of Gaelic Ireland. Today, Armagh is home to two cathedrals (both named after Saint Patrick) and the Armagh Observatory and is known for its Georgian architecture.

Experience the excellent city of Newry

Newry is the most southern city of the six counties of Northern Ireland. It is a very historic city and was founded in 1144 alongside a Cistercian monastery, although there are references to earlier settlements in the area, and is one of Ireland’s oldest towns. The city is an entry to the “Gap of the North”, close to the border with the Republic of Ireland. It grew as a market town and a garrison and became a port in 1742 when it was linked to Lough Neagh by the first summit-level canal built in Ireland or Great Britain.

Narrow Water Keep and Castle, Warrenpoint

Narrow Water Castle is a famous 16th-century tower house and bawn near Warrenpoint in Northern Ireland. It is beside the A2 road and on the County Down bank of the Clanrye River, which enters Carlingford Lough a mile to the south. Narrow Water Castle was given into state care in 1956.

Day 6: South Down to North Down

Experience the Beautiful Mourne Mountains

Credit: farm6.clik.com

The third day of our road-trip takes us into the striking Mourne Mountains. The tallest peak at 850 metres is Slieve Donard. The Mourne Wall still stands, having been completed in 1922 and connects 15 of the 28 peaks. Finish off with a cup of tea in the Slieve Donard Hotel.

Experience Newcastle

Newcastle, Co. Down
Newcastle, Co. Down

Newcastle is a small and beautiful town on the coast. It is located at the foot of the Mourne Mountains on a beach which makes it a beautiful and scenic location. The sheer beauty of this place has encouraged this place to be an attractive seaside resort. The town is also known for its close proximity to the world famous Royal County Down Golf Club.  The town itself brands itself as an “activity resort” for Northern Ireland and its main selling-point of being at the foot of Slieve Donard.  In recent years, the town has seen a regeneration project which costs millions of pounds. This scheme has made the town an even better tourist attraction.

Take the Strangford – Portaferry Ferry

Take one of the most scenic ferries in the north, the Strangford – Portaferry Ferry. This Ferry transfers passengers and cars between the picturesque village and Portaferry. After taking this Ferry, head north towards Bangor.

Beautiful Bangor

Bangor is a large town in County Down. It is a seaside resort on the southern side of Belfast Lough and within the Belfast Metropolitan Area. In 2007 the town was voted by UTV viewers as the most desirable place to live in Northern Ireland. Tourism is important to the local economy, particularly in the summer months, and plans are being made for the long-delayed redevelopment of the seafront; a notable historical building in the town is Bangor Old Custom House.

Celebrate the end of your trip with a pint in Belfast’s oldest traditional pub – Kelly’s Cellars

Kellys-cellars

Celebrate the end of your trip with a pint in Belfast’s oldest traditional pub – Kelly’s Cellars. Located in Bank St, Kelly’s Cellars is one of Belfast’s oldest traditional Irish pub, situated in the heart of the city. Described as “a hidden gem that oozes old traditional values”, it is famous for a pint of Guinness, served with homemade Irish beef stew. Built in 1720, Kelly’s Cellars has changed very little in 200 years and still has most of its original features.

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