Irishman quits job to live in 500-year-old ‘haunted’ cottage on Rathlin Island

The Irishman quit his job as a human resources executive in Dublin to live on Rathlin Island in a 500-year-old ‘haunted cottage’.

Rauri Morgan, 41, worked as a human resources executive in the heart of Ireland’s capital city, but he was hard hit when he found out the company was closing and he would have to tell the staff they were losing their jobs.

However, Rauri made the most of a bad situation and decided it was time for a big shift in his lifestyle.

Not wanting to go back to a high-pressure job in the city, Rauri moved to the remote and tiny Rathlin Island situated between Northern Ireland and Scotland.

A new way of life – moving from the city to a remote island

Irishman quits job to live in 500-year-old ‘haunted’ cottage on Rathlin Island.
Credit: Tourism Ireland

Escaping Dublin’s rat race, Rauri moved to an island just off the coast of his hometown Ballycastle into a 500-year-old cottage that was formerly owned by his grandmother.

The cottage had lain derelict for 15-years before Rauri moved in and when he arrived, it had a flushing toilet and an outside tap, but no electricity.

Appearing on the Channel 5 show, New Lives in the Wild, Rauri said he was thriving on the island, despite his dislike for water, fishing, and the cold – not to mention the fact that he believes the cottage is haunted by ghosts who he regularly hears ‘partying’ in the living room.

Under normal circumstances, Rauri makes a living and gets to know the locals by working shifts in a local pub. In his spare time, he also volunteers as a firefighter!

Helping those in need – assisting refugees

Irishman quits job to live in 500-year-old ‘haunted’ cottage on Rathlin Island.
Credit: Tourism Ireland

Speaking to the New Lives in the Wild presenter Ben Fogle, Rauri said he has travelled to the Greek island of Lesbos six times to assist refugees. He stated that when he watches the sea from the island, he is reminded of just how “dangerous the sea can be”.

Reflecting on his time helping refugees, Rauri said, “People were seasick, they were scared, they urinated on themselves.

“You have the most vulnerable people sitting and swirling around in that kind of mess for maybe two to three hours; it was pretty horrific.”

Rauri’s bids to help those in need inspired an initiative on Rathlin Island to raise thousands for struggling refugees, and since Rauri’s first trip, eight other locals from the island have made trips to Lesbos.

Speaking of the sense of community on the island, Rauri said, “It’s like a big family. There are obviously ones you like more than others, but we would be very defensive of one another as well, even though we don’t agree with each other all the time.”

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