The Dublin Bucket List: 23 things to do in Dublin before you die

Ireland’s capital, Dublin, is a city busting with culture and things to experience. If you are lucky enough to live there or visit for a short period, you need to make the most of your time and to see all the major attractions. Here is our Bucket List for the city, the things you must do in Dublin before you die!

1. Visit Ireland’s most famous University and its magical library – Trinity College Dublin

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Trinity College is one of the seven ancient universities of Britain and Ireland, as well as Ireland’s oldest university. It is a prestigious University and has beautiful characteristics such as the old library which is open to visitors.

2. Visit Ireland’s most famous Prison – Kilmainham Gaol

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Kilmainham Gaol is a former prison located in Kilmainham in Dublin, which is now a museum. It has been run since the mid-1980s by the Office of Public Works, an Irish government agency. Kilmainham Gaol played an important part in Irish history, as many leaders of Irish rebellions were imprisoned and some executed in the prison by the British and in 1923 by the Irish Free State. It is a fantastic tourist attraction now and provides daily tours.

3. Visit the home of Ireland’s most famous drink – The Guinness Storehouse

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Guinness Storehouse is a tourist attraction dedicated to Ireland’s most famous drink at St. James’s Gate Brewery in Dublin. Since opening in 2000, it has received over four million visitors, making it Ireland’s most visited attraction. The Storehouse covers seven floors surrounding a glass atrium shaped in the form of a pint of Guinness. It is an excellent tourist attraction and has to be on any Irish Bucket List!

4. Party at Ireland’s best-known Nightclub – Copper Face Jacks

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Credit: www.irishtimes.com

Love it or loathe it, this is currently Ireland’s most famous  nightclub. The Harcourt Street nightclub, which stretches over three floors, can expect a crowd of up to 1,000 on any of the seven nights a week on which it opens, with numbers doubling on Saturdays.

5. Visit the Historic Collins Barracks

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Collins Barracks is a former military barracks in the Arbour Hill area of Dublin, Ireland. The buildings are now the National Museum of Ireland, Decorative Arts and History. Housing both British armed forces, and Irish army garrisons through three centuries, the barracks were the oldest continuously occupied example in the world. It is a very interesting historical site and is a must for anyone who visits Dublin!

6. Visit National Gallery of Ireland

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The National Gallery of Ireland houses the Irish national collection of Irish and European art. It is located in the centre of Dublin with one entrance on Merrion Square, beside Leinster House, and another on Clare Street. Due to ongoing renovations, the Clare Street entrance is the only one currently open. It was founded in 1854 and opened its doors ten years later. The Gallery has an extensive, representative collection of Irish painting and is also notable for its Italian Baroque and Dutch masters painting. The current director of the gallery is Sean Rainbird. Entry to the gallery is free.

7. Do the 12 Pubs of Christmas

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12 Pubs of Christmas has been a phenomenon in recent years in Dublin. “Christmas jumpers” or sweaters and Santa hats are the uniform of choice for the soldiers of the 12 Pubs and every weekend in December you will see drunk Santa Clauses and Mrs. Clauses in every town in Ireland. It is always a fun and memorable occasion!

8. Visit the centre of power in Ireland – Leinster House

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Leinster House  is the seat of the Oireachtas, the national parliament of Ireland. Leinster House was originally the ducal palace of the Dukes of Leinster. Since 1922, it is a complex of buildings, of which the former ducal palace is the core, which house Oireachtas Éireann, its members and staff. The most recognisable part of the complex, and the ‘public face’ of Leinster House, continues to be the former ducal palace at the core of the complex.

9. Visit Ireland’s biggest stadium for an All-Ireland Final – Croke Park

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Croke Park is home of the GAA in Ireland. Named in honour of Archbishop Thomas Croke it is often called Croker by some GAA followers in Dublin, it serves both as the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). The greatest occasion anyone can go to here is a football or hurling All-Ireland Final. Tickets are like Gold Dust but if you get the chance you must grab it!

10. Eat at a Michelin starred restaurant without breaking the bank – The Chapter One

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This Michelin starred restaurant is endlessly popular, and definitely a bucket list kind of place for a special occasion. However it doesn’t have to break the bank – the three course pre-theatre menu is €37.50, while the 8 course tasting menu is €85pp.

11. Visit the symbol of revolution in Ireland – The General Post Office (GPO)

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The General Post Office in Dublin is the headquarters of the Irish Post Office, An Post, and Dublin’s principal post office. Dublin’s GPO is indelibly associated with the 1916 Rising and the events that led to the creation of an independent Irish state. The stern grandeur of its façade, Irish flag flying proudly aloft, is an image that evokes a justifiable sense of heroism and nationhood. In the course of its long history, the GPO has witnessed much more than the events of Easter Week.

12. Visit Dublin Castle

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Dublin Castle off Dame Street, Dublin, Ireland, was until 1922 the seat of British rule in Ireland, and is now a major Irish government complex. Most of it dates from the 18th century, though a castle has stood on the site since the days of King John, the first Lord of Ireland. The Castle served as the seat of English, then later British government of Ireland under the Lordship of Ireland (1171–1541), the Kingdom of Ireland (1541–1800), and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1800–1922). After the signing of the Anglo-Irish Treaty in December 1921, the complex was ceremonially handed over to the newly formed Provisional Government led by Michael Collins.

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  The Irish Bucket List: 101 places to see in Ireland before you die (Book)