Fancy getting out of the States? Here is how to move to Ireland from America

With everything that is going on right now in America, we wouldn’t blame you for wanting to escape. So, here is how to move to Ireland from America.

With riots and violence taking hold across America, life in the States is becoming more of a nightmare than the American Dream.

So, while moving halfway across the world might not be the easiest decision, it could be a great option if you are worried about America’s future.

If fulfilling the dream of moving to the Emerald Isle is something you’d like to take charge of this year, then we have got you covered. Here is how to move to Ireland from America.

Head to the Irish embassy – a great place to start

Visit the Irish embassy.
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In 2005, the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS) was established to provide a ‘one-stop-shop’ concerning asylum, immigration, citizenship, and visas. You can find out what visas you will require to make the move to Ireland here.

U.S. citizens can travel to Ireland for a period of three months without requiring a visa. However, if you want to stay longer than that, there are three options. You can either go to Ireland to work, study, or retire.

Options are available for a long stay ‘D’ visa for those who want to work, study, or join family members who already live in Ireland. You can find out more about the options available to you here.

Things to be aware of – what you need to know before applying

Things to be aware of before making the move to Ireland from America.
Credit: Tourism Ireland

The option of studying in Ireland may seem appealing at first. However, it is important to be aware that any length of time spent studying in Ireland is not counted as a period of residence when applying for citizenship.

Applying for a work permit is incredibly difficult, and there are many obstacles that may stand in your way. For example, you need to have a job lined up before applying, and it becomes more challenging to obtain a visa if your earnings are below €30,000.

A great place to look for job postings in Ireland is irishjobs.ie.

The third option is retiring in Ireland, and although this may seem appealing, new laws brought in in 2015 have made this more difficult.

The new laws require that those who wish to retire to Ireland have an annual income over $55,138 (€50,000) per person for the rest of their lives in Ireland, regardless of their current available cash or lack of debt.

Further, if you want to immigrate to one of the six counties within Northern Ireland, the process will be different for you as you will have to apply via the U.K. home office. Find out more here.

While the process of immigrating to Ireland may appear daunting, it is not all bad. The U.S. allows dual citizenship with Ireland and the U.K., so you won’t have to give up your American citizenship.

Where to live – life in Ireland

Where to live in Ireland.
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We would advise that you know where you are going to be living in Ireland before making the move, so this could mean a few trips to the Emerald Isle beforehand to find your perfect home.

House prices in Dublin, and across Ireland as a whole, have been on the increase in recent years. However, quieter towns and cities will still offer more affordable living options.

A great place to start your research is daft.ie for great advice on buying property in Ireland.

The cost – the price of moving to Ireland

How much it will cost if you move to Ireland from America.
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Moving to another country will never be a cheap affair, so it is best to make sure you have enough money before taking the plunge.

Depending on whether you have a job lined up or not, it is best to have a decent amount of savings to allow you to prepare for the worst.

The cost of living in Ireland can be quite expensive, especially if you are moving to Dublin, so it is best to come prepared.

Moving all of your possessions from the U.S. will cost you to ship them, and depending on the area in which you choose to live, you may also need to buy a car. So, it is important to consider the cost of everything that is involved in moving to Ireland from America.

However, once you have made it through all the difficult bits of finding a job, applying for a visa, finding somewhere to live, and all the logistics involved, we are sure you won’t regret making the move to the Emerald Isle.

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