32 mad phrases: one mad local phrase from every county in Ireland

Have you heard any of these mad local phrases from every county of Ireland?

It must be quite tricky sometimes when people from other English speaking countries come to Ireland and hear us talking in Irish slang.

Of course, there are lots of English words we use correctly, but Irish people love using unique phrases to describe things.

Every county has its own unique slang and phrases, some of which you might not have heard before.

Here is one mad local phrased from every county in Ireland so you can always know what the people from that county are actually trying to say.

32. Antrim she’s a double bagger

Number 32 on our list of 32 mad phrases from Ireland is "she's a double bagger".
Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

Meaning: She is so ugly you would have to put a bag over your own head to get with her.

31. Armagh– take her handy

Meaning: An expression meaning be careful or take care.

30. Carlow – he ran like da clappers

"He ran like da clappers" is often heard in Carlow.
Credit: stocksnap.io

Meaning: He ran away very fast

29. Cavan yer some boy, you are

Meaning: You’re an eejit.

28. Clare – stall the digger

Number 28 on our list of 32 mad phrases from Ireland is "stall the digger".
Credit: pixabay.com / @Fotorech

Meaning: Take it easy or stop what you’re doing.

27. Cork – you had a hilo

Meaning: You had a fall or an accident.

26. Derry – look at the shape of him/her/yer man/yer one

Meaning: Look at how that person is dressed or acting or representing themselves.

25. Donegal – like a bag o’ weasels

People from Donegal say "like a bag o' weasels".
Credit: pixabay.com / @martakoton

Meaning: Used to describe someone in a bad mood or someone who is hard to talk to.

24. Down – snared a waker

Meaning: To be badly caught out doing something that you shouldn’t have been.

23. Dublin – d’ya know wah I mean like?

"D'ya know wah I mean like?" is another one of the 32 mad phrases from Ireland.
Credit: pixabay.com / @Tumisu

Meaning: Do you understand what I am trying to say. Often thrown onto the end of a sentence that makes absolutely no sense.

22. Fermanagh – there’s a want in ya as big as an ass

Meaning: Describing someone as being a bit stupid or not being the sharpest tool in the box.

21. Galway – I’ve seen better men on top of wedding cakes

"I've seen better men on top of wedding cakes".
Credit: pixabay.com / @alexramos10

Meaning: Used to describe a man who is unattractive or a man with a more attractive partner.

20. Kerry are ya picking up what I’m putting down?

Meaning: Do you understand what I am trying to say.

19. Kildare alright lid, any stir?

"Alright lid, any stir?" is one of the 32 mad phrases from Ireland.
Credit: pixabay.com / @Free-Photos

Meaning: Lid is the Kildare pronunciation of Lad, and any stir means what’s up or what’s going on.

18. Kilkenny – ya coming for a puck about?

Meaning: Are you coming to play a bit of hurling but nothing too intense.

17. Laois – that fella is as feckin’ mane

"The fella is as feckin' mane".
Credit: pixabay.com / @image4you

Meaning: Someone who refuses to spend money and will never put his hand in his pocket.

16. Leitrim – ‘mon we get langers

This Leitrim phrase is one of the 32 mad phrases from Ireland.

Meaning: Come with me and let’s go and get drunk.

15. Limerick – acting the maggot

Number 15 on our list of 32 mad phrases from Ireland is "acting the maggot".
Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

Meaning: the term ‘acting the maggot’ is used as a lighthearted Irish insult for when someone is joking around and/or up to no good.

14. Longford – that fella would rob the milk out of your tea

Meaning: Describing someone with no morals who would steal just about anything.

13. Louth – the shape of ya

Meaning: An insult used to describe the state of someone’s physical appearance, often used in combination with a string of other insults.

12. Mayo – chill the beans

"Chill the beans".
Credit: pixabay.com / @groovelanddesigns

Meaning: If someone tells you to chill the beans, they want you to calm down and relax.

11. Meath – chance your arm at it

Meaning: An expression meaning you may as well try something, what’s the worst that could happen?

10. Monaghan – chancin’ quare ones

Meaning: When you are “chancin’ quare ones” you are so desperate for the shift that you are trying girls or guys of a lesser standard than you usually would.

9. Offaly – away with the fairies

Number nine on our list of 32 mad phrases from Ireland is "away with the fairies".
Credit: pixabay.com / @Pexels

Meaning: Someone who is away with the fairies is generally in a world of their own detached from what is actually going on. Also known as “to have notions”.

8. Roscommon – tight as a duck’s arse

Roscommon’s addition to our list of 32 mad phrases from every county of Ireland has a crazy meaning.

The last reputation you want to have is being as tight as a duck’s arse; it means you are known to be overly frugal and not spend your money.

7. Sligo – I haven’t got a balls notion

"I haven't got a balls notion".
Credit: pixabay.com / @RobinHiggins

Meaning: If you haven’t a balls notion, then you are completely and utterly clueless about the topic or item in discussion.

6. Tipperary – having a right shneere

Meaning:  If you are having a right shneere in Tipp, then you are having a great auld time altogether, and there are probably a few laughs involved.

5. Tyrone – a day for the hay

32 mad phrases from Ireland includes "a day for the hay".
Credit: pixabay.com / @12019

Meaning: This means that you are currently experiencing good weather that is ideal for farming.

4. Waterford – you’re about as useful as a Kilkenny man with a football

"You're about as useful as a Kilkenny man with a football".
Credit: pixabay.com / @pixel2013

Meaning: This person is implying that you are useless or very bad at the task at hand.

3. Westmeath – tell your story walking

Meaning: If someone says this to you, then they have no interest in hearing what you have to say and want you to walk away from them as you say it.

2. Wexford – the smell of rage off ya

Number two on our list of 32 mad phrases in Ireland is "the smell of rage off ya".
Credit: pixabay.com / @ErikaWittlieb

Wexford’s addition to the 32 mad phrases from every county of Ireland means when someone is so angry that you can physically tell.

1. Wicklow – that’ll learn him

Meaning: This is the Wicklow interpretation of saying “that will teach him a lesson”.

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