The Leinster Bucket List: 28 AMAZING places to experience before you die

One of Ireland’s four provinces, Leinster, has a lot of offer. Here are the 28 things best things that everyone must have on their Leinster Bucket List.

1. River Shannon from Athlone Town, Co. Westmeath

River_Shannon,_Athlone,_Co._Westmeath,_Ireland_-_geograph.org.uk_-_345361

The River Shannon is the longest river in Ireland at 360.5 km. This is an amazing part of the river. Certainly a site to see!

2. Molly Malone, Dublin

molly-malone-statue

“Molly Malone” (also known as “Cockles and Mussels” or “In Dublin’s Fair City”) is a popular song, set in Dublin, Ireland, which has become the unofficial anthem of Dublin City. The Molly Malone statue in Grafton Street was unveiled by then Lord Mayor of Dublin, Alderman Ben Briscoe during the 1988 Dublin Millennium celebrations, declaring 13 June as Molly Malone Day. The statue was presented to the city by Jury’s Hotel Group to mark the Millennium.

3. Newgrange, Co. Meath

newgrangeee

Newgrange is a prehistoric monument in County Meath, Ireland, about one kilometre north of the River Boyne. It was built about 3200 BC, during the Neolithic period, which makes it older than Stonehenge and the Egyptian pyramids. Newgrange is a large circular mound with a stone passageway and chambers inside. The mound has a retaining wall at the front and is ringed by ‘kerbstones’ engraved with artwork. There is no agreement about what the site was used for, but it has been speculated that it had religious significance – it is aligned with the rising sun and its light floods the chamber on the winter solstice. It is the most famous monument within the Neolithic Brú na Bóinne complex, alongside the similar passage tomb mounds of Knowth and Dowth, and as such is a part of the Brú na Bóinne UNESCO World Heritage Site.

4. Trim Castle, Trim, Co. Meath

Trim_Castle_6

Trim Castle is a Norman castle on the south bank of the River Boyne in Trim, County Meath, Ireland. Over a period of 30 years, it was built by Hugh de Lacy and his son Walter as the caput of the Lordship of Meath. The Castle is noted for the part it played in the filming of the Mel Gibson directed film Braveheart.

5. Proleek Dolmen, Cooley Peninsula, Co. Louth

www.trekearth.com
www.trekearth.com

The megalithic dolmen at Proleek, located in the legendary Cooley Peninsula, is one of the finest examples in Ireland, and is widely photographed and documented. Access to the dolmen is through the grounds of a hotel, and then across a golf course, but it is well worth a visit. Nearby is a wedge tomb, or gallery grave.

6. Wheat, Collon, Co. Louth

WheatField

Experiencing the amazing wheat in Co. Louth is a reminder of the enormous role agriculture has played in the history of Ireland. The beauty of a wheat field is amazing.


7.Birr Castle, Co. Offaly

8012423292_0be9f278f9_h
www.blueforest.com

Birr Castle is a large castle in the town of Birr in County Offaly, Ireland. It is the home of the seventh Earl of Rosse, and as such the residential areas of the castle are not open to the public, though the grounds and gardens of the demesne are publicly accessible.

8. The Abbey at Clonmacnoise, Co. Offaly

006e3cae7187b11f303827ea5e41cc49

The monastery of Clonmacnoise is situated in County Offaly, Ireland on the River Shannon south of Athlone. Clonmacnoise was founded in 544 by St. Ciarán, a young man from Rathcroghan, Co. Roscommon. Until the 9th century it had close associations with the kings of Connacht. The strategic location of the monastery helped it become a major centre of religion, learning, craftsmanship, and trade by the 9th century and together with Clonard it was the most famous in Ireland, visited by scholars from all over Europe. From the ninth until the eleventh century it was allied with the kings of Meath. Many of the high kings of Tara and Connacht were buried here.

9. River Liffey, Dublin

www.centralhoteldublin.com
www.centralhoteldublin.com

The Liffey is a river in Ireland, which flows through the centre of Dublin. Its major tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac. The river supplies much of Dublin’s water, and a range of recreational opportunities.

10. Trinity College, Dublin

TrinityCollegeDublin

Trinity College in Dublin is arguably the most prestigious University on the island of Ireland. The architecture on the campus is spectacular and historic. It is also home to the Book of Kells. The campus is always full of tourists. It is a University like no other!

11. Kilmainham Gaol

kilm

Kilmainham Gaol is a former prison located in Kilmainham in Dublin, which is now a museum. It has been run since the mid-1980s by the Office of Public Works (OPW), an Irish government agency. Kilmainham Gaol played an important part in Irish history, as many leaders of Irish rebellions were imprisoned and some executed in the prison by the British and in 1923 by the Irish Free State.

12. Ha’penny Bridge, Dublin

my.liveireland.com
my.liveireland.com

The Ha’penny Bridge, known later for a time as the Penny Ha’penny Bridge, and officially the Liffey Bridge, is a pedestrian bridge built in 1816 over the River Liffey in Dublin, Ireland. Made of cast iron, the bridge was cast at Coalbrookdale in Shropshire, England.

13. Malahide Castle, Co. Dublin

2050746007_001e577c26_o

Malahide Castle, parts of which date to the 12th century, lies, with over 260 acres of remaining estate parkland close to the village of Malahide, nine miles north of Dublin in Ireland.The estate began in 1185, when Richard Talbot, a knight who accompanied Henry II to Ireland in 1174, was granted the “lands and harbour of Malahide”. The oldest parts of the castle date back to the 12th century and it was home to the Talbot family for 791 years, from 1185 until 1976, the only exception being the period from 1649–60, when Oliver Cromwell granted it to Miles Corbet after the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland; Corbet was hanged following the demise of Cromwell, and the castle was restored to the Talbots. The building was notably enlarged in the reign of Edward IV, and the towers added in 1765. The estate survived such losses as the Battle of the Boyne, when fourteen members of the owner’s family sat down to breakfast in the Great Hall, and all were dead by evening, and the Penal Laws, even though the family remained Roman Catholic until 1774.

14. Stradbally, Co. Laois

stradbally-co-laois-ireland-church-the-irish-image-collection-

Stradbally is a picturesque town in County Laois, Ireland, located in the midlands of Ireland along the N80 road, a National Secondary Route, about 12 km (7 mi) from Portlaoise. It is known for the birth of motor racing, the Steam Rally and the Electric Picnic.

NEXT PAGE: Places 15-28

Page 1 2

  The Irish Bucket List: 101 places to see in Ireland before you die (Book)