10 memories that all Irish 90s kids have

If you grew up in Ireland in the 90s, you’ll probably have certain childhood memories that other Irish people won’t. Here we list the top 10.

10 memories that all Irish 90s kids will have

Growing up in Ireland is a truly unique experience, and growing up in the 90s even more so. From racing home to school to watch The Den to staying up to watch The Late Late Toy Show, it was a magical and innocent time.

In this article, we will take a trip down memory lane and reminisce about 10 memories all Irish 90s kids will have.

10. Payphones – for calling home

10 memories that all Irish 90s kids will have include payphone
Credit: Shannon McNeice / Flickr

If you were out and needed to call home, a public payphone was your savior. If you were running low on money, trying to reverse the charges was a move that all Irish 90s kids would have tried.

9. Xtra-vision – renting VHS tapes and DVDs

10 memories that all Irish 90s kids will have include Xtra-vision
Credit: Ardfern

Before Netflix and other online streaming services, Xtra-vision was the place to go to see the latest movies. Irish 90s kids were not stuck for choice when presented with the glorious collection of DVDs the store had for rent.

If you forgot to return it on time, however, not only would you have to pay an extra fee, but your mother would be after you with the wooden spoon too! (See #2.)

8. Walkman – for music on the go

10 memories that all Irish 90s kids will have include Walkman

Back in the 90s if you wanted to hear music while on the go, besides holding a boom box on your shoulder, the Walkman was the device all Irish 90s kids needed to have.

While revolutionary at the time, it was true to its name; if you tried to run or do anything besides walking with it, the Walkman would annoyingly start to skip on you.

7. The Den – the childhood entertainment

10 memories that all Irish 90s kids will have include The Den

The Den was the show to watch for Irish 90s kids. From Zig and Zag with Ian Dempsey to Dustin and Socky with Ray Darcy there was always fun and games to keep you entertained.

6. The Late Late Toy Show – the magic memories

Credit: @caitrionambalfe / Twitter

All Irish 90s kids will recall fondly the magic of The Late Late Toy Show hosted by Uncle Gaybo (may he RIP). It was the one night of the year where your parents allowed you to stay up late and enjoy some treats. 

5. Glenroe – the Irish TV staple in every household

10 memories that all Irish 90s kids will have include Glenroe

Glenroe was a firm fixture in every Irish household on Sunday evenings. The TV show focused on the lives of people such as Biddy and Miley living in a fictional rural village in Wicklow. While the show was a popular drama with adults, it gave Irish kids the fear, as they knew that school on Monday morning was very close.

4. The Irish 90s football team – the dream team

Ireland's football team in the 90s was the dream team
Credit: INPHO

It might be hard to imagine, but there actually was a time when the Irish football team was a force to be reckoned with. When Jack Charlton was at the managerial helm, they had unprecedented success in the Italia 90 and USA 94 world cups, and anyone old enough to remember will recall the nation going wild in support.

3. The Teletext – the Internet before the Internet

The Teletext was like the internet before the internet in Ireland
Credit: @90sfootball / Twitter

The Teletext was like the Internet before the Internet; on it you could find out the weather, match results, and the cinema listings. Provided you knew the numbers to enter and had the patience to wait half an hour for your page to appear!

2. The wooden spoon – the threat

The threat of the wooden spoon was familar to kids growing up in Ireland in the 1990s

Irish 90s kids will know all too well the threat of the wooden spoon. To most, it would be a simple kitchen utensil but to Irish mammies, it was a threat to ensure their children behaved and didn’t act too bold.

1. Flat 7 Up – the cure

Irish mammies would give sick children a flat 7 Up

Anytime her child would fall sick with a sore tummy, an Irish mammy would always turn to the old reliable for the cure. That cure, of course, was flat 7 Up. Depending on the severity, the Irish mammy would add dry toast for good measure too.

The 90s was certainly a special time indeed and contained memories that all Irish 90s kids still hold dear.